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Just a quick mail to say how pleased I have been with your Hoodia pills. I'm half way through my third bottle, and will be ordering again very soon. Keep up the good work over there.

J.A from USA

Articles

THE TRANSFORMATION OF A FOOD JUNKIE: KICKING THE HABIT – JUDY MAZEL’S SEEKING OF NEW ULTIMATE DIET

I realized that all my dietary beliefs, my acceptance of what scores of diet doctors had told me, everything I had grown up believing about food, eating, and fat was . . . suspect. Maybe the answers really weren't out there yet. I knew I couldn't go on any of the old diets again. Not only did they not work, they were not healthy!

I was seeking the ultimate diet. Nothing I tried really worked. Stillman; Atkins; counting carbs, calories; eating my dinner for breakfast. All were rigid prescriptions for failure.

I was running out of books to read and nutritionists to learn from. One day when I was wondering whether there ever would be an answer, I pulled off the freeway in search of cashews and discovered the missing link in a health-food store—the catalyst that propelled me to develop the Beverly Hills Diet. What I found was a book about enzymes and the digestive system. The author suggested that the combination of foods eaten was the key to good digestion, and I immediately zeroed in on this as the key to losing fat. I began reading about enzymes and the pivotal role they play in the digestive process. I hit the libraries and read everything I could get my hands on about those little devils.

As I discovered the basic laws of digestion and the role enzymes play in food processing, I began to throw out everything I had been taught to believe about a balanced meal. I realized that while it is true we need the proper balance of protein, carbohydrates, and fats in our diet, the idea of eating a "balanced" meal is as absurd as wearing two skirts or two pairs of shoes at the same time.

And I threw out everything my fat self had always believed about diets and dieting. Prehistoric man didn't eat a balanced diet. He ate some berries; he'd kill an animal and eat it. He'd find some nuts and a few slugs. Somewhere in the course of our social evolution it became "convenient" to eat breakfast, lunch, and dinner. "Convenient" to eat a "balanced" meal. But was "balanced" in fact a true description of what our diet should be? Was "balanced" based on the facts of health?

*18©\8*

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